Posts tagged ‘Egyptology’

January 4, 2014

THE EGYPTIAN CALENDAR

by eirenehogan

I have noticed I have a couple of followers on this blog.  Wow, thanks for that.  I think therefore I should post some more.

I’ve been reading a lot on calendars over the Yule period, and it is very complicated.  I will attempt to post more on it as time goes on.  But anyway, for now is some more info on the Egyptian calendar.

 

Bede wrote a fascinating book on how the year and the months were calculated according the movement of the sun, the moon and the planets.  It is a collection of the knowledge of the ancients that he could get a hold of.  It is called The Reckoning of Time (or the Latin thereof).  In it he examines ancient calendars, the Roman calendar and the Anglo-Saxon calendar.  You can access it from Google Books, and I have linked the above title to that.

 

Below I have transcribed the Egyptian calendar as he recorded it.  The dates of the beginning are according to the Roman calendar, and therefore ours – well, taking into account how often that calendar was out.  The months did not begin exactly on those days but give or take a day or so according to how accurately both the Egyptian and the Roman calendar reflected the actual cycle of the sun at the time.

 

Interesting to note that they had leap years.  I don’t know what era this calendar belongs too.  To say something is ‘Ancient Egyptian’ allows for about 3000 years of time.  As Bede has access to the info I’d assume it comes from Greek/Roman writers who had access to such places as the Alexandrian Library. Now as the Roman calendar dates are given, I am assuming this calendar was in force during Roman times.  Yeah, more research needed here.

 

 

Months

 

Name of month

Date of Roman Calendar when month begins

Thoth 29 August
Phaophi 28 Sept
Hathyr 29 Oct
Choiac 27 Nov
Tybi 27 Dec
Mecheir 26 Jan
Phamenoth 25 Feb
Pharmouhti 27 Mar
Pachons 26 April
Payni 26 May
Epieph 25 June
Mesore 25 July
5 intercalated days / 6 every four years 24 Aug

 

From:

The Reckoning of Time, By Saint Bede (the Venerable).

Trans. Faith Wallis, 1999,

Liverpool University Press,

viewed from GOOGLE Books (viewed 3.1.14)

p. 45.

 

December 30, 2013

Ancient Egyptian New Year – 20th july

by eirenehogan

The Ancient Egyptians had twelve 30 day months, divided into 3 ten day weeks.  At the end of the year they had an extra 5 day week to make up the year.

Early Egyptologists believed that a tablet from the First Dynasty showed Egyptians had linked the rising of the Sirius star as the beginning of the year – which was in mid July. However closer analysis of the tablet puts doubt on this.  Also, mid July was when the Nile began to flood and was first seen in the capital of Egypt, Memphis (near modern Cairo).  Surely this is a much more likely reason for it to be the beginning of the Egyptian year.

The modern date given for the Ancient Egyptian beginning of the year is 20 July.

 

 

 

 

 

(source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_calendar)

The Postgrad Chronicles

Medieval History from Alfred the Great to The Battle of Castillon

%d bloggers like this: