Archive for ‘religion’

June 15, 2016

I am not a sinner I am just a primate trying to survive

by eirenehogan

In honour of all the poor people killed in Orlando, and also for the poor guy who was so mixed up, misguided and hung up that he felt he needed to do it, I want to post this meme I found on Facebook.

This clarifies and simplifies the meaning of life beautifully, and makes transparent all the ridiculous guilt religion tries to lay on us, which causes so much unnecessary pain and agony in our lives.

i am just a primate

May 2, 2016

Origins of the term ‘Easter’ are ANGLO-SAXON!!!

by eirenehogan

AAAGGGHHH!!!!  There are all these memes circulating the internet claiming the Ancient Near Eastern Goddess Ishtar is the origin of the name of Easter.

The theory seems to be based on the fact that the name sounds similar.  WHAT???  You can’t base etymology on that.  That is like saying, ‘the sun comes up every day, so, um, how does it get there?, well, it looks like someone must put it there, so, um, a god must put it there.’

Easter is NOT named after the Babylonian goddess Ishtar. Ishtar, as the great Goddess of Babylon, is an Akkadian name, and as such is SEMITIC.  The term ‘Easter’ is of Germanic origin.  It is an old Anglo-Saxon name.  And – despite some politicians foolishly believing English is derived from Latin (ie, Christopher Pain — oops I mean, Payne), Anglo-Saxon is a proud member of the Germanic language family.

Bede

The name is Easter is the English term for the Christian festival.  The Romans called it Pascha.  The Anglo-Saxons had a goddess named Eostre.  She was the goddess of spring and the month of the spring, most probably at the time of the spring equinox, was named after her, as was explained by Bede in his book ‘On the Reckoning of Time’.

That name, Eostre, has come down through Middle English and into Modern English, as ‘Easter’.

I would doubt very much that any Anglo-Saxons knew anything of Ishtar.

Jeez, do a bit of research!  In face, all you need to do is check Wikipedia. See the entry Names of Easter.


February 19, 2016

Why ‘I was only joking,’ isn’t good enough

by eirenehogan

‘I was only joking.’  Is that an acceptable explanation for an offensive prejudicial jibe at someone?i was only joking

 

Presumably you say it because you feel upset that the other person thinks you are a bigot and you feel you aren’t.  But instead of examining your own language and ideas, trying to understand their perspective, and learning something from the incident, you reject their comments and views and emotions.

 

You think your feelings are more important than theirs.  You then tell them how they should feel, that they should not be upset and that you should be allowed to say offensive things to them.

 

You are acting like you are the one in control and you are controlling the other’s actions, feelings and thoughts.  You are acting like a bigot.

 

Instead you should listen to the other person, realise you made a mistake in saying the comment. Yu should try and see it from their point of view. Even if you felt it was a joke, they did not.  If any joke upsets someone, then they are fully entitled to feeling that emotion.  If any comment upsets someone, then there must be something in that comment that is upsetting, whether you had intended it to be or not.

 

You are the one who has made the mistake.  You should acknowledge your mistake and apologise.  If you feel you are not a bigot, then do not say things that others may interpret as prejudicial.

November 2, 2015

How radicalization happens.

by eirenehogan

IN REGARDS TO THE SO-CALLED ‘RADICALIZATION’ OF YOUTH IN AUSTRALIA

When a new culture comes into a land, those of the old culture feel uncomfortable, because this new culture is strange and different to their own.  They feel fear.  That fear turns into hatred.

The obvious current example is the fear of those of Islamic religion.

By expressing that hatred and anger at Islamic people (or any minority group) you make them feel unwanted in our country and that they are not allowed to be part of our country and our culture.  They are then forced to live only within their own culture.

They also feel fear, from your unwelcoming attitude, and they resort to finding solace within their own culture – because that is the only one you are allowing them to be part of – to help deal with that fear.

In time this fear can also turn to anger and will be expressed against those who have not welcomed them into this country.  And that leads to “radicalisation”, and racial violence against you; the very thing you feared in the first place.

The irony is, if you show acceptance and interest in their culture, then they will feel accepted in our country, be peaceful and nice, and are more likely to adapt to our culture.

October 31, 2015

EARLY MENTION OF HALLOWEEN CELEBRATIONS IN AUSTRALIA – 1858.

by eirenehogan

Is Halloween ‘Un-Australian’?

My son reminded me recently that it is Halloween soon (yes, it is today).  He doesn’t want the trick or treating or the scary monster stuff, he just enjoys have a little celebration to mark Spring and that school will be over soon and Xmas and the long summer holidays will be coming.  We don’t have any formal spring celebration here (since Easter is the true ‘spring’ celebration, but for us it is in autumn).  So Halloween is a good one for it.

halloween 1858 vic

So many of the older generation seem to begrudge our kids – and young adults – the right to enjoy Halloween.  They are just showing their age.  We didn’t have it, so why should our kids have it?  Huh?  Why not?  Our younger generation have been doing it since at least the early 2000s, probably since the 1990s.  So they have grown up doing it, so for them it is now part of their everyday way of life in this country, ie, it IS Australian for them.

They aren’t doing it because of all the advertising in the shops, they are doing it most likely because of our modern global village world and with the internet they see so much of it that they want to do it too.  And why can’t they?  The only reason ever given is, ‘because it is American.’  Huh?  What sort of reason is that?  Sounds like prejudice to me.  Oh, it’s American = bad.  Funny how it is prejudice if you criticize any other culture, but they seem to think it isn’t prejudice when you criticise something because “it is American”.

‘Because it is not part of Australian culture.’  Oh, you mean it is not of Aboriginal heritage?  I doubt that is what the mean.  They mean because it didn’t come over with the first fleet.  To begin with, cultures are constantly evolving. I mean, if we didn’t allow cultures to evolve we’d all be living in the caves.  Hey, we don’t wear crinolines any more either and women have the vote, I mean, come on…

And as for it not coming over with the first fleet … well, don’t know about that.  It is an old Scottish tradition so would have come over here with any Scots, and there are mentions of it in colonial newspapers.  Here is an example of an early Halloween celebration held in Victoria – in Mount Alexander Mail, on 22 October 1858.

(source TROVE: http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article199051715)

As I said, Halloween is an old Scottish tradition (how did it get to American? It isn’t an American Native tradition) and it is based on an old pagan Celtic tradition – Samhain.

But even apart from all that – why can’t we celebrate it in Australia? Huh? If we want to we can. That doesn’t mean we HAVE to if we don’t want to, it just means, if people think it is fun, why not go for it?

July 30, 2015

Is this proof the soul does not exist?

by eirenehogan

Fascinating blogpost from Godless Cranium.  To quote him:

“We have often described our ‘self’ as something separate from our bodies. Most of our religions describe some sort of soul that leaves or changes as we die, but this experiment shows that by simply cutting off communication between our two hemispheres, we can create two consciousnesses that are independent of one another.

While you’re reading this, you could have two different opinions of this piece, depending on which hemisphere you asked.

How creepy but fascinating is that? And are there more ‘I’s’ lurking around in our skulls that we haven’t discovered yet?

No matter how you look at it, I think this shows that the soul doesn’t exist if you think your consciousness or the thing that you describe as ‘I’ or ‘you’ is essentially what your soul is.

What do you think?”

http://godlesscranium.com/2015/07/29/does-split-brain-surgery-show-there-is-no-soul/comment-page-1/#comment-5471

July 11, 2015

There is no need to ‘prove’ god does NOT exist

by eirenehogan

It has been said by theists that “One cannot prove that god does not exist any more than one can prove he does”.  But atheists don’t need to prove god does not exist.  There is no evidence of any such thing.  Most likely in our ancient past, before any scientific research was ever done, people made up some stories to explain why things happen in the world and why people die and what happens when they do.  They would also have tried to make up some stories to explain why we feel a sense of moral right and wrong and why people shouldn’t kill and shouldn’t hurt others.  Those stories have become what we call ‘religion’.  They have become part of our culture and have been handed down to us over the centuries.

Why should we have to try and prove if those stories are about something or someone who is ‘real’ or not?  They are not based on any evidence at all.  Do we need to go out and try and prove if Cinderella exists or not?  Or Jack and the giant from Jack and the Beanstalk?  We all consider such fairy tales, that have also been handed down over the generations, to be good yarns that also teach our children something about right and wrong.  No one seriously considers we need to prove that the characters in them do NOT exist.  So why should atheists be expected to have to prove if god does or does not exist?  We consider the stories of god just that, stories, no more.  If someone out there seriously believes Cinderella does exist, it is up to them to prove it.  And they cannot prove it by simply quoting the Cinderella story.

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Medieval History from Alfred the Great to The Battle of Castillon

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