How radicalization happens.

by eirenehogan

IN REGARDS TO THE SO-CALLED ‘RADICALIZATION’ OF YOUTH IN AUSTRALIA

When a new culture comes into a land, those of the old culture feel uncomfortable, because this new culture is strange and different to their own.  They feel fear.  That fear turns into hatred.

The obvious current example is the fear of those of Islamic religion.

By expressing that hatred and anger at Islamic people (or any minority group) you make them feel unwanted in our country and that they are not allowed to be part of our country and our culture.  They are then forced to live only within their own culture.

They also feel fear, from your unwelcoming attitude, and they resort to finding solace within their own culture – because that is the only one you are allowing them to be part of – to help deal with that fear.

In time this fear can also turn to anger and will be expressed against those who have not welcomed them into this country.  And that leads to “radicalisation”, and racial violence against you; the very thing you feared in the first place.

The irony is, if you show acceptance and interest in their culture, then they will feel accepted in our country, be peaceful and nice, and are more likely to adapt to our culture.

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5 Comments to “How radicalization happens.”

  1. I assume you heard what presidential candidate Ben Carson had to say about Muslim presidents…?

    Your essay is so right on.. it’s sad.

    Kit

  2. I think the sentiment is naive, in Germany radicalism came from a sense that people tried the system and it failed, communist radicalism comes from the idea of unity beyond nationalities. Sometimes (if not most times) violence comes from percieved power even, not just percieved weakness.

    What radicalism tends to point out is mostly that Socrates was wrong… not everyone wants to play nice. As regards Islam its far more a rejection of secularism and its ethos of acceptance as a mechanism to create an economic marginalization of minorities. They see “tolerance” itself as a tool of oppression so they react with the opposite. (Think of the idea of “whiteness” as developed in african american lituriture). So to say that we need more tolerance is as if you told them “we need more oppression.” Thats why solutions have been elusive.

    I can’t say that western economic players are whats best for them myself… nor can I say that in accepting them as morally responsinle human beings I can simply excuse adherence to ideals I oppose as immoral. If I think they are my equal, then I will judge them.

    Only if I look down on them can I pat them on the head and say they are juat backward

    That’s the rub.

    • I wasn’t talking about any radical political views developed within countries and cultures, but I was talking about migrant youth within their new migrant country. I was writing in response to some talk in Australia about the ‘radicalisation of youth’ when young people of Islamic migrants become disenchanted with their new country and support the radical political and social views of their original homeland.

      Sure, some may well do it because they genuinely agree with those views. Everyone is different and we shouldn’t assume they are all the same.

      (I don’t think they do it because some people just ‘don’t want to play nice’ – to quote you, that is a “naïve” view. People will often do something that others may see as not ‘playing nice’ but for them, they do believe it is. People do what they think will help them and their family, and will not ‘play nice’ only when they believe others will not ‘play nice’ to them. It is a means of protection of themselves and their family. In fact it accounts for your very reaction to my post. You see these radical people as not nice, so you don’t want to act nice to them).

      But if we react to the disaffected young in our society with aggression and hatred – regardless of what their reason for having those views is – no surprise they will do the same back to us. It is a pretty simple formula. I am not saying we should accept that young people are allowed to be mean and nasty, but we need to handle the situation much more cleverly than simply being mean and nasty back to them.

      • I’m not saying be mean and nasty, nor did I advocate that. I said take them seriously, they seem to think it’s a deadly serious issue at least. Your patronizing answer to me shows just how far from that you are.

        The fact you disregard the why of how they hold such views shows you really don’t want to understand them. It’s ends based thinking that really disrespects their contextual experiences.

        Don’t assume everyone that wants to take on hard issues is promoting violence or that they hold violence as a solution. It is not “mean and nasty” to take someone grimly… And again it’s only naivety that thinks that.

        The worst kind of people attack with hugs and kisses.

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